ARF Mourns the Loss of Levon Hayrapetyan

YEREVAN (A.W.)—The Armenian Revolutionary Federation (ARF) released a statement on Oct. 19, mourning the untimely death of Armenian businessman and philanthropist Levon Hayrapetyan.

Levon Hayrapetyan during his latest trial (Photo: Armenpress)

“Mr. Hayrapetyan was a patriotic figure who was concerned with the fate of the nation and worked towards its prosperous and secure future. One may recall his several initiatives directed at the revival and strengthening of Artsakh, which inspired and broadly addressed the hearts of grateful compatriots,” read a part of the statement.

Hayrapetyan, who contributed tens of millions of dollars to causes in Armenia, Artsakh, and the Armenian Diaspora, passed away in a Russian prison overnight on Oct. 18. He was perhaps best known for spearheading a mass wedding in Artsakh, which he co-sponsored with fellow Russian-Armenian businessmen. Some 700 couples were married in the ceremony in an effort to encourage an increase in Artsakh’s population. Hayrapetyan subsequently became a godfather to 250 newborns

“[Hayrapetyan’s] unselfish devotion was also demonstrated by his steadfast readiness to support the activities of the Armenian Cause,” the ARF statement continued.

Hayrapetyan’s arrests and convictions are widely believed to have been a part of a politically motivated campaign against prominent Russian businessmen. Following his 2016 conviction, factions of the National Assembly of Artsakh, as well as several prominent individuals and organizations in and out of Armenia, issued a statement urging Russian law enforcement bodies release Hayrapetyan.

The 68-year-old died in a prison cell in Mordovia on Oct. 18.

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

  1. Despite the manner with which he “restored” of Gandzasar Cathedral, which can indeed be considered crony capitalism and a form of vandalism, Hayrapetyan was no doubt a well intentioned man and a genuine nationalist.

    The problem with him was that he was also your typical nouveau riche of the post-Soviet period. He was an oligarch who got wealthy during the lawless/criminal years after the Soviet collapse in Russia. Moreover, very typical of the 1990s era oligarchs in Russia, he also had one foot in the West. Needless to say, Russian authorities did not like this one bit, and I don’t blame them. Hayrapetyan’s ties with the Western world was the reason why Moscow did not trust him. Instead of coming to terms with Moscow, Hayrapetyan, like your typically stubborn, emotional and politically illiterate Armenian, made his situation worst.

    But, as I said, for his credit, Hayrapetyan was a great nationalist. So, we need to at least give him credit for that.

    Now, the main reason why Hayrapetyan is being praised on this board is because he was imprisoned by Russian authorities for his illegal activities. In other words, his imprisonment and subsequent death is meant to be used for Russophobic propaganda purposes by anti-Russian agents imbedded in our communities.

    And this is the sad (or funny) part of this matter: Had Hayrapetyan been living in Armenia, he would have not been held accountable for any of his wrong doings and he would have been spat upon by the same people who are now praising him. What Hayrapetyan’s life and death teaches us therefore is that Armenians love their criminals, mafia bosses, monopolists, oligarchs, etc – as long as they are not made to directly suffer from their actions.

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