Uncle Garabed’s Notebook (May 27, 2017)

Old Time Adage

The trouble with secrets is that they’re either not worth keeping, or they’re too good to keep.

Footprints in the Sand

One night a man had a dream. He dreamed he was walking along the beach with the Lord. Across the sky flashed scenes from his life. For each scene he noticed two sets of footprints in the sand: one belonging to him, and the other to the Lord. When the last scene of his life flashed before him, he looked back at the footprints in the sand. He noticed that many times along the path of his life there was only one set of footprints. He also noticed that it happened at the very lowest and saddest times in his life. This really bothered him and he questioned the Lord about it:
“Lord, You said that You would walk with me all the way. But during the most troublesome times in my life, there is only one set of footprints. Why did You leave me when I needed You most?”
The Lord replied; “My precious child, I love you and would never leave you. During your times of trial and suffering, where you see only one set of footprints, it was there that I carried you.”

Lapsus Linguae

Ornithologists are for the birds.

From the Trivia File

William McKinley was the first president to ride in an electric car—the ambulance that took him to the hospital after he was shot by an assassin.

Inside Dope

Edo: How’s your newly-wed nephew, Garo, doing?
Bedo: He’s leaving his wife because of another woman.
Edo; Really? Who?
Bedo: Her mother.

What’s in a Name?

Akbasharian: Turkish and Arabic in derivation, ak in Turkish is defined as white, clean; and bashar in Arabic is defined as good news.

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CK Garabed

C.K. Garabed (a.k.a. Charles Kasbarian) has been active in the Armenian Church and Armenian community organizations all his life. As a writer and editor, he has been a keen observer of, and outspoken commentator on, political and social matters affecting Armenian Americans. He has been a regular contributor to the Armenian Reporter and the AGBU Literary Quarterly, “ARARAT.” For 20 years, Garabed has been a regular contributor to the Armenian Weekly. He produces a weekly column called “Uncle Garabed's Notebook,” in which he presents an assortment of tales, anecdotes, poems, riddles, and trivia; for the past 10 years, each column has contained a deconstruction of an Armenian surname. He believes his greatest accomplishment in life, and his contribution to the Armenian nation, has been the espousing of Aghavni, and the begetting of Antranig and Lucine.

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