ATP’s Aram and Maral Celebrate Vardavar!

Armenians Around the World Celebrated Vardavar on July 3

The following comic strip was prepared by illustrator Alik Arzoumanian for the Armenia Tree Project (ATP). It was co-authored by Arzoumanian and Nayiri Haroutunian.

Alik Arzoumanian is an illustrator living in Cambridge, Mass. She illustrates and designs the Armenia Tree Project children’s newsletter. She has been published by Marshall Cavendish Children, Scholastic, Ladybird Books, and Sterling Publishing, among others. You can learn more about her work and view her illustrations by visiting www.studioalique.com.
Nayiri Haroutunian is program manager at Washington Green Schools in Seattle, Wash., an environmental education non-profit that seeks to inspire environmental leadership skills in students across the state. She previously worked as environmental educator at Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, developing, implementing, and evaluating engaging programs for diverse urban youth. She holds an MS in natural resources and environment from the University of Michigan and is passionate about local food and photography.

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Alik Arzoumanian is an illustrator living in Cambridge, Mass. She is also the Armenian kindergarten teacher at St. Stephen's Armenian Elementary School in Watertown, Mass. She illustrates and designs the Armenia Tree Project (ATP) children's newsletter. She has been published by Marshall Cavendish Children, Scholastic, Ladybird Books and Sterling Publishing, among others.

2 Comments

  1. Dear Alik and Nayiri,
    Your work is absolutely adorable and necessary for Armenians young and older to learn of our ancient traditions. In my father’s Armenian village of KERAMET located near LAKE IZNIK and close to BURSA, Vardavar was known as CHURPOTEEK. Here are the recollections of my father, Sarkis aka “Deli” Sarkis:
    “All of the children of the village participated. I was in a group of six. Early in the morning, we would get ready by looking for thin, stiff branches of trees. We already had a long piece of old burlap under which we would hide. Two of us leading the group would cut eye holes in the burlap and then all of us holding the burlap with the branches held vertically began our adventure. We would go to a house and make such a commotion that the inhabitant would come outside and douse all of us with a pail or bowl of water. Then laughing and squealing we went from house to house, each time repeating what we had done before. The end result was that by the time we got home to change were were completely soaked and completely happy.”

  2. Dear Ellen, I just saw your comment!
    Thank you so much for sharing your father’s memories about Vardavar, and your kind words about my work.

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