New Book: ‘Memories of Tomarza’

Memories of Tomarza

By Toros M. Madaghjian
Paperback: 342 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (May 28, 2015)

Cover of Memories of Tomarza
Cover of Memories of Tomarza

The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire sets the historical time for Memories of Tomarza. The author, Toros M. Madaghjian (1890-1989), originally published Memories of Tomarza in Armenian in 1959. The book was translated by Reverend Father Arten Ashjian into English and reprinted by the Madaghjian Family in May 2015, in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide.

This book is a compilation of first-hand, personal stories and memories collected 60 years ago from survivors who left Tomarza and settled in Wisconsin. Madaghjian gives interesting ethnographic information about the origin and development of the village of Tomarza, its historical ups and downs, its heroic episodes, the patriotic spirit of its children, its revolutionary, active struggles, and the founding of New Tomarza inside of Armenia. It is also a history of St. Mesrob Church in Racine, of the people from Armenia who settled in Racine, and of the first Sunday School established at an Armenian Church in the United States.

The book contains the personal memoirs of the 1915 deportation of Madaghjian’s brother, Hagop, who was martyred in 1920. Memories of Tomarza is lovingly dedicated to his memory.

In 1959, Madaghjian said, “This book is being consigned to the present and next generations as a remembrance of our beloved birthplace, nine centuries-old Tomarza, of our brave ancestors, of its self-sacrificing heroes, its magnificent churches, and the numerous deportees of 1915 who became martyrs.”

To purchase a copy of Memories of Tomarza, visit www.amazon.com/Memories-Tomarza-Toros-M-Madaghjian/dp/1512053546.

 

Guest Contributor

Guest Contributor

Guest contributions to the Armenian Weekly are informative articles written and submitted by members of the community, which make up our community bulletin board.

4 Comments

  1. I was looking for sth really not related with history but about Tomarza. The name of the book took my attention and take me to your page.

    I’m a Turkish guy from one of the most Armenian populated neighbourhood of Istanbul: Kurtuluş – and Tomarza is hometown of my girlfriend. I can’t wait to read memories of Mr. Madaghjian, respectfully.

    I hope future won’t give such memories to our nations again.

    Best wishes to you all.

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